Tutorial: plastic keychains

kaiami:

I know a ton of you have been waiting for this one. Teaching you to make your own plastic keychains!

To start off, I think the biggest question everyone has is what I use to make them. I work with shrink film. You might be familiar with Shinky Dink brand shrink film as a kid. I use Grafix brand white inkjet shrink film. The inkjet kind is relatively pricey compared to the regular kind. If you’re using regular, I don’t recommend you stick it in your printer. Sharpie markers would be good for that.

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Alright, now open up the file with the images that you’re working with. Make sure your images are a lot bigger than you want your finished product to be since they shrink significantly.

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You’ll also want to lighten the opacity to about half. I go somewhere between 50-60%.

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Now print your image out! I’ve found that it works best for me when I have it at the plain paper setting, and standard print quality.

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Holepunch with a 1/4” holepuncher BEFORE you shrink them. It’s so much more work to have to punch holes when your plastic is thick!

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Cut out your design, leaving the amount of border you want.

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Set them on a tray for convenience. An aluminum foil sheet works too, but I recommend cookie trays because they are easier and quicker to get out of the oven.

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Preset heat. Your shrink film package will tell you what temperature to set it at, but I find that it isn’t always accurate for me. I generally set temperature to 350 degrees or so.

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Put them in the oven. Remember to keep track of time! I leave them in for about a minute and a half.

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After time is up they should be super small! Magic!

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If your charms are not flat, put something heavy on it right out of the oven when they are still hot and malleable.

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If you’d like to, you can seal them now. In my last two batches, I used clear topcoat nail polish. The problem with that is that I need between 3-5 coats of it, and it takes a while to dry. I’ve been experimenting with modpodge.

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For lariats, you can use jump rings or lobster clasps.

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Here is one that I made that wasn’t sealed. The finished texture after shrinking is a little bit rough. There’s nothing wrong with leaving them unsealed, but because they are inkjet printed, the colors wash right of without protection.

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This is one that was sealed with modpodge. The colors become a little more vibrant and smooth and water resistant. Things often get stuck on when applying or drying so be careful.

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These ones down here were sealed with clear nail polish. They come out shiny if you put enough coats, but the grainy texture will still be there.

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Well, there ya go! Have fun making your own keychains!



devkimiko:

Adventures in printing Part 2. It’s really long because there’s no easy way to explain these things. Today we look at some printing terms and how to size your files for print! Part 1 (Colourspace) here, and Part 3 (Making InDesign PDFs) here.



devkimiko:

Printing Adventures Part 3, or possibly the longest post ever (I actually maxed out my image limit). Today I try to explain how to use InDesign CS5 to make PDFs! It’s actually not too hard once you wrap your head around it, but new programs and processes can be intimidating. Following on from Part 1 (Colourspace) and Part 2 (DPI, bleed, resizing).





A summary of localization changes to Henry's character

fe-according-to-japan:

All right, I finally wrote up a brief reference for this with full citations. Enjoy.





Pokémon The Origins : Subbed Episodes



WACOM TABLET DRIVER NOT FOUND - What Do

fox-orian:

So, you put your Windows computer to sleep for the night. You come back the next day all eager to wake it up and put it right to work on that thing you’ve been working on and ….

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Oh no, this won’t do at all — you’ve seemed to have lost all pressure sensitivity and high resolution tracking! Well, you figure, why not go check the driver settings. Maybe it’s just groggy and needs a little morning reminder? You go to your Control Panel, click on Wacom Properties Configu—-

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Ah. Well then. Isn’t this interesting?

Now, you figure, there’s only one way to recitfy this: save your work, close all your programs, and do a full system restart. What a fun time this is.

But HOLD ON! There’s another way yet! Try this out first before pulling the plug:

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Open your Start menu (or press the Windows Key) and simply type “Services”. There will be an icon at the top of your list which appears to be two small gears with the name “Services.” Double click that and look what happens next:

imageScroll down the list and select “Wacom Professional Tablet Service" from the list of services and click the little "Restart" link in the column to the left. Now simply wait for the service to stop and start itself back up again!

If for some reason, clicking this little “Restart” button makes matters WORSE, the failsafe approach is the manual restart. Double click the “Wacom Professional —” service and a window will pop up.

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Manually stop the Wacom driver by clicking the clearly marked button. Wait for it to shut down, then start it back up again when the button becomes visible. Once restarted, click OK!

Test your Tablet now in Photoshop. You may have your pressure sensitivity fully restored!

IF NOT, well then simply close and reopen Photoshop, which will be nice and quick since it (and your work) are still loaded into recent memory. It surely beats having to restart the whole computer!

Now, providing you’ve done it correctly, (really now, how could you not,) you should find your Wacom’s pressure and tracking sensitivity fully restored! AND you’ll have access to the Tablet Properties config app once again!

Celebrations! For discovering such a wonderful little time saver.

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Edit: POINTS! to konirathax.



zambiunicorn:

geekysideburns:

zambiunicorn:

geekysideburns replied to your post: I’m having a hard time no…

Have you gotten to reference layers yet because OMG.

WAT IS THAT

Here’s what I’m trying to say in gif form. I rambled insanely.

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The blue layer is set to reference.

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Then you can do this.

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And this.

Ohhhhhh that is so cool :O :O  :O